KJV and Tudor Music

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KJV and Tudor Music

Postby MPaul » Tue Jul 24, 2012 10:17 am

People think that the KJV is written in Elizabethan English, that it is essentially Shakepearean in style. However, in reality, experts place the style of English as Early Tudor, and specifically the 1540s. Although the translators worked in the early 17th century, actually they used the style of William Tyndale, and he used a 1540s English (note my correction below -- it actually was an English of 1500-1540), but he changed it somewhat, to be a biblcal style, to retain the feel of Scripture already being ancient. Actually, it appears that Tyndale influenced Shakespeare, rather than his influencing the KJV translators, but he used mainly the Geneva bible. However, these translators were also influenced by Tnyndale. Note the following link to writings from the 1500s, and note how expression of or near the 1540s reflects the KJV style.

http://englishhistory.net/tudor/primary.html

To truly understand the KJV, and to truly understand the powerful spiritual anointing on this version, one has to try to understand the English of its time. In the 16th century there was a powerful anointing on the development of the English language in general, and it appears the English knew it. Understanding what was going on with the language of this time is part of appreciating the KJV. There are a number of good books on the historical development of the English language which cover this time period, but it seems no one such book is completely thorough.

The Tudor times were very special in general -- it is quite fascinating, thier dress, architecture, manners, etc. (The movie The Other Boelyn Girl on disc has a special section reviewing the history of the time, explaining the Tudor period was not actually what it seemed, but the society was actually ugly and disgusting. This movie and historical review were put out by Hollywood, and thus, we can be certain, the Tudor period truly was a beautiful time in history. The review is completely distorted to accomplish an agenda. However, any time in history has an ugly side, as well as what is beautiful).

The Tudor period also had its own music, and I think the flutes really make it distinctive. (However, music is not something that technically I know much about, but I may change that in the future). Music expresses the spirit, which is why it is an important part of worshipping. I wonder, if we understand the spirit behind the music of the Tudor times, will we then understand the spirit behind the KJV better?

Here is a link to a little Tudor music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xw59KAcObFI
Last edited by MPaul on Fri Aug 31, 2012 4:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: KJV and Tudor Music

Postby MPaul » Fri Aug 03, 2012 6:14 pm

I have a more powerful example of music. "Greensleeves" has been attributed to Henry VIII, as well, but it may be Elizabethan. It was a very popular song and even referenced by Shakespeare. In the 19th century the lyrics for "What Child Is This? were written, and then, set to the music of "Greensleeves." There are various versions of the lyrics.

Here is a link to a version of "What Child Is This?" and with lyrics (which are written on screen) set by someone who understood the language of the KJV. This interpretation of the song is truly what I was getting at, in questioning the relation between music and the KJV. And this interpretation is more than peace, harmony, simplicity, but it touches the spirit so deeply and leaves the soul in a state of purity and reverence before God. (Note also the solo flute portion).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MC9cbEHjvPs
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Re: KJV and Tudor Music

Postby MPaul » Fri Aug 31, 2012 4:57 pm

I should not make posts by memory. I would now like to make a correction. I was just looking again at The Literary Lineage of the King James Bible by Charles Butterworth. He reviews at pages 9-22 how the language of the KJV matches with the common use of English in the early Tudor period. Actually, the language corresponds with the English of 1500-1540. In the link I had set out, I saw the resemblance with the letters of the 1530s and 40s. However, the resemblance does even appear in letters as early as 1482.

Sorry about the error. However, one does have to be extremely careful on the history of the KJV, as there is so much evidence, and it seems no one expert has access to it all, and thus, differing conclusions arise -- for instance, differing positions are taken on when did the first Roman type edition appear, did Tyndale actually study at Cambridge, or to what extent was he influenced by Luther's translation, based on what evidence an authority reviews.
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